The National Resource Center for Supported Decision-Making Invites You to a Three Part Webinar Series

March 25, 2015

The Next Generation of Freedom and Self-Determination: Moving Support Decision-Making from Theory to Practice

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FACILITATOR FOR THE WEBINAR SERIES

Michael Morris, Excecutive Director, Burton Blatt Institute and Executive Director, National Disability Institute (NDI)

Michael Morris has over 25 years of experience in research, knowledge translation, and system change activities advancing community participation and economic self-sufficiency for individuals across the full spectrum of disabilities. Morris's undergraduate degree, political science with honors, is from Case Western University, and his law degree is from Emory University School of Law in Atlanta, GA. In 1981, Morris was named the first Joseph P. Kennedy Fellow in Public Policy and worked for Connecticut Senator Lowell Weicker as legal counsel to the U.S. Senate Subcommittee on the Handicapped. He next served as counsel to the U.S. Senate Small Business Committee. Morris then worked at United Cerebral Palsy Associations as Director of Government Relations, then Director of Community Services, and finally National Executive Director. During his 14-year tenure, his leadership put focus on assistive technology's role in employment, education, communications and daily living. Morris' proposal for policy development led to passage by Congress of the Assistive Technology Act. Read more.



WEBINAR ARCHIVE

WEBINAR PART I - April 16, 2015  [1:00pm-2:30pm]

Supported Decision-Making and Youth in Transition

Archived Presentation Materials

PRESENTERS

Pamela Downing-Hosten, Office of Specialized Instruction, District of Columbia Public Schools

Dr. Pamela R. Downing-Hosten holds a B.A. in Elementary Education, a M.A. in Human Development/Special Education and an Ed.D. in Educational Leadership. She has over 35 years in the field of both general and special education serving as a Teacher, Coordinator, Director of Special Education, and Assistant Superintendent of Student Services. She has served taught Master's and Doctoral level students and served, as an expert witness for both general and special education matters.

Pamela is knowledgeable of research-based practices used to teach students with disabilities while closing the achievement gap. Managing a $340 million dollar budget for Special Education, Dr. Downing-Hosten led students toward double-digit gains in both reading and mathematics by utilizing innovative strategies and blended resources.

Currently, Dr. Downing-Hosten is leading major reform in the District of Columbia Public Schools with a targeted focus on Secondary Transition, the Transfer of Educational Rights, and Supported Decision Making. She has also designed Secondary Transition curricula that are aligned with Common Core State Standards. Her work on modifying the standards for students to earn a Certificate of Individualized Education Program Completion has increased the number of students earning a Standard High School Diploma.

Jonathan Martinis, Legal Director, Quality Trust for Individuals with Disabilities and Project Director, National Resource Center for Supported Decision-Making.

Jonathan Martinis has over 20 years’ experience representing people with disabilities in cases under the Americans with Disabilities Act, The Rehabilitation Act of 1973, The Social Security Act and other civil rights laws.  In 2013, he represented Margaret "Jenny" Hatch in the "Justice for Jenny" case, which held that Ms. Hatch has a right to use Supported Decision-Making instead of being subjected to a permanent, plenary guardianship.  He also represented the plaintiffs in Brinn, et al. v. Tidewater Regional Transportation District, the first case to hold that people with disabilities have a right to paratransit transportation on a next-day basis, and Winborne, et al. v. Virginia Lottery, which held that the Lottery must ensure that premises selling Lottery tickets, including private businesses, are accessible to people with disabilities. 

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Special Education Transition Services are designed to facilitate the movement of the child from school to post-school activities based on the individual child’s needs, taking into account the child’s strengths, preferences and interests.

20 USC 140(34)

The individualized transition plan is an opportunity to not only focus on development of employment and independent living skills but also to build and practice self-determination. Why then are so many parents being told to consider guardianship and deny their child’s right to fully participate in the IEP development?


Webinar Part II: May 14, 2015 [1:00pm-2:30pm]

Supported Decision-Making and Medicaid, Home and Community Based Services Settings Final Rule

Archived Presentation Materials

PRESENTERS

Barbara Brent, Director of State Policy, NASDDDS

Barbara is the Director of State Policy for NASDDDS. She  has more than 34 years of experience in publically funded systems for children and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. She has worked in state and county government, as well as in the private sector. Before joining NASDDDS in 2012, Barbara spent six years as the state director for the Arizona Division of Developmental Disability Services, supporting more than 30,000 children and adults with developmental disabilities, along with their families.

Samantha Crane, Director of Public Policy, ASAN

Samantha is the Director of Public Policy at ASAN’s national office. She  is a graduate of Harvard Law School and has previously served as staff attorney at the Bazelon Center of Mental Health Law, focusing on enforcing the right to community integration as established by the Supreme Court in Olmstead v. L.C., and as an associate at the litigation firm Quinn Emanuel Urquhart, & Sullivan, L.L.P., where she focused on patent and securities litigation. From 2009 to 2010, Samantha served as law clerk to the Honorable Judge William H. Yohn at the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.

Jonathan Martinis, Legal Director, Quality Trust for Individuals with Disabilities

Jonathan Martinis has over 20 years’ experience representing people with disabilities in cases under the Americans with Disabilities Act, The Rehabilitation Act of 1973, The Social Security Act and other civil rights laws.  In 2013, he represented Margaret "Jenny" Hatch in the "Justice for Jenny" case, which held that Ms. Hatch has a right to use Supported Decision-Making instead of being subjected to a permanent, plenary guardianship.  He also represented the plaintiffs in Brinn, et al. v. Tidewater Regional Transportation District, the first case to hold that people with disabilities have a right to paratransit transportation on a next-day basis, and Winborne, et al. v. Virginia Lottery, which held that the Lottery must ensure that premises selling Lottery tickets, including private businesses, are accessible to people with disabilities.

"The setting is selected by the individual from among setting options including non-disability specific settings… are based on individual needs and preferences."

"The setting is integrated in and supports full access of individuals receiving Medicaid HCBS to the greater community, including opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive, integrated settings and engage in community life…"

"How can individuals with disabilities be more involved in the decisions about settings that enhance engagement in community life? How would supported decision-making help to make decisions about setting options that are based on individual needs and preferences?"

January 16, 2014

CMS Final Rule on Home and Community Based Settings


Webinar Part III: June 17, 2015  [1:00pm-2:30pm]

Supported Decision-Making and the ABLE Act, "Achieving Better Life Experience"

Archived Presenation Materials

PRESENTERS

Lisa Mills, Public Policy Chair, TASH

Lisa A. Mills, Ph.D. is currently a consultant on disability employment policy and systems change working in fourteen states under various contracts with state government agencies and federally funded initiatives.  She has 25 years of experience in the field of disabilities with a primary focus on people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.  Prior to becoming involved in the area of employment, Lisa worked on self-determination, self-advocacy and supported decision-making through a Robert Wood Johnson grant in Wisconsin.  She assisted self-advocacy leaders in Wisconsin to establish People First Wisconsin, a statewide, independent non-profit organization and acted as their administrator for six years.  She also worked as a consultant in Dane County, Wisconsin on the roll out of self-directed services, including development of self-advocacy and self-determination training resources and supported decision-making resources.

Allison Wohl, Executive Director, APSE

Allison Wohl is the Executive Director of the Association of People Supporting EmploymentFirst (APSE), a national membership organization that promotes the full inclusion of people with disabilities in the workplace and community. After fifteen years in corporate America, having worked in the federal practices of several “Big Four” consulting firms, as well as at GE, Allison knew it was time to leave her busy life as a consultant for the even busier, but more rewarding world of disability advocacy, after the birth of her youngest son Julian in 2009, who was diagnosed with Down syndrome. Allison received her MBA from the College of William and Mary and her undergraduate degree from SUNY Binghamton. In addition to Julian she is the mom of two other boys.

Jonathan Martinis, Legal Director, Quality Trust for Individuals with Disabilities

The Achieving Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act breaks new ground in exploring opportunities for eligible individuals with significant disabilities to rethink their future goals regarding work, income saving and investment, and community participation. The beneficiary of an ABLE account is also the owner of the account. Over 25 states are now considering legislation to set a framework for the establishment and administration of ABLE Accounts. Who will make decisions about savings goals and disbursements from ABLE accounts? Are there less restrictive options for account owners than guardianship and the removal of decision-making authority?


The National Resource Center for Supported Decision-Making A project of

Quality Trust logoBBI logoKU Life Span Institute

 

This project was supported, in part by grant number HHS-2014-ACL-AIDD-DM-0084, from the U.S. Administration for Community Living, Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, D.C. 20201. Grantees undertaking projects under government sponsorship are encouraged to express freely their findings and conclusions. Points of view or opinions do not, therefore, necessarily represent official Administration for Community Living policy.

For more information, visit the National Resource Center for Supported Decision-Making.